The Noise Spectrum: Sounds You Didn’t Know Damage Your Hearing

Hearing is an important part of everyday life, yet most people don’t realize when they are damaging their ears. Causes of hearing loss include infections, aging, and brain injury, but one of the most common is noise exposure. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) can develop after one occurrence of extreme noise exposure or after listening to very loud sounds over time. Everyone has tiny hair cells in their inner ear (cochlea) that vibrate and send an electric signal to the auditory nerve, allowing you to hear. Different groups of hair cells interpret different sound frequencies. Over time, if enough of these hair cells are damaged or broken, hearing loss results.

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The sound of power.

People with severe to profound hearing loss depend on their hearing aids completely. Without exceptionally powerful devices, they are cut off acoustically from family, friends and colleagues. So it makes sense to offer as broad a selection as possible, with smaller hearing aids that suit individual lifestyles and tastes without compromising on the power of better hearing.

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Tips on living with tinnitus

Tinnitus is described as a phantom auditory perception – perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound signal. This may affect one or both ears. A tinnitus diagnosis is often a surprise. Unfortunately, some patients often learn from their doctors that their “ringing-in-the-ears” is untreatable. This kind of information makes patients feel isolated and convinced that no one can understand what they are going through. Because tinnitus has many causes, there is no specific medication or general cure. Despite this, even for chronic tinnitus, there are ways to find relief and take control.

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Tune out tinnitus

Simply relaxing while listening to an audio book, reading a novel or watching a movie – as people who live with the torment of tinnitus know all too well, these usually enjoyable pastimes are often exhausting because of persistent noise in their ears.

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Get the facts about tinnitus

Signia hearing aids are tiny technological marvels. They not only amplify sounds and improve hearing, they also provide a range of solutions to alleviate the effects of tinnitus, letting you hear what’s important without stress. But what exactly is tinnitus? We have collected a few facts and answered a few frequently asked questions.

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How does inductive charging technology work?

You already know it from electric toothbrushes or smartphones: You simply set the device down or put it in the corresponding holder and the batteries begin to charge. With inductive charging technology, electrical energy is transferred from one object to another contact-free in order to operate or supply the latter object.

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Cellion. Revolutionary battery-free hearing.

"Get new batteries" – a reminder that many hearing aid wearers have on their calendar: Depending on the intensity of use, the little power suppliers have to be replaced about every two weeks with conventional hearing aids. But now they can confidently remove this from the calendar.

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In-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids

Do you know which hearing aid style is best suited to your needs? Let us help you make an informed decision and find your ideal solution in cooperation with your hearing aid professional. Learn more about ITE hearing aids in this blog entry and the great advantages they bring to the table.

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1997: Prisma. A computer for the ear

A new era in hearing aid technology began in 1997: Prisma was launched, the world’s first completely digital hearing aid with two microphones, which automatically adjusted to the current hearing situation.

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1959: Auriculette. From a vest pocket to behind the ear.

Like its predecessors, the 1959 Siemens Auriculette 326 consisted of a microphone, amplifier, and earphone, with a battery as a power supply. In the Auriculette, however, the components were so small and lightweight that they fit together in a single housing worn comfortably behind the ear.

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Make phone calls the smart way with Signia hearing aids

Whether professional or personal: the telephone is the ubiquitous means of communication. With the new Signia hearing aids with TwinPhone program, using the telephone is now easy and convenient, even in challenging hearing situations. And thanks to easyTek™, the hearing aids can even be connected directly to Bluetooth-enabled phones and work as a headset for wireless hands-free operation.

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1913: Louis Weber and the Phonophor

Originally planned as a single hearing aid for a friend of the company, the device turned out to be a huge success, and series production was launched in December 1913 – marking the start of the long and successful history of our hearing aids.

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